Why do we map threats? Linking threat mapping with actions to make good decisions for biodiversity c

Tulloch, V.J.D., Tulloch, A.I.T., Visconti, P., Halpern, B.S., Watson, J.E.M., Evans, M.C., Auerbach, N.A., Barnes, M., Beger, M., Chadès, I., Giakoumi, S., McDonald-Madden, E., Murray, N.J., Ringma, J., and H. P. Possingham (2015). Why do we map threats? Linking threat mapping with actions to make good decisions for biodiversity conservation. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 13: 91-99 Spatial representations of threatening processes – “threat maps” – can identify where biodiversity is at risk, and are often used to identify priority locations for conservation. In doing so, decision makers are prone to making errors, either by assuming that the level of threat dictates spatial priorities

Global status of and prospects for protection of terrestrial geophysical diversity

Sanderson, E., Segan, D.B. and J.E.M. Watson (2015). Global status of and prospects for protection of terrestrial geophysical diversity. Conservation Biology, 29: 649-656. Conservation of representative facets of geophysical diversity may help conserve biological diversity as the climate changes. We conducted a global classification of terrestrial geophysical diversity and analyzed how land protection varies across geophysical diversity types. Geophysical diversity was classified in terms of soil type, elevation, and biogeographic realm and then compared to the global distribution of protected areas in 2012. We found that 300 (45%) of 672 broad geophysical diversity types currently meet the

The use of Senate inquiries for threatened species conservation

Shumway, N. and Seabrook, L. (2015), The use of Senate inquiries for threatened species conservation. Ecol Manag Restor, 16: 196–198. doi:10.1111/emr.12178 Global biodiversity continues to decline at a steady rate, especially in Australia where 10% of the land mammal population has become extinct since European settlement. The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act (EPBC) list of threatened species is Australia's version of the IUCN red-list; however, not all species fit easily within the EPBC guidelines and criteria for listing. Recently, a high-profile Senate inquiry was used to bring about the listing of the koala, Phascolarctos cinereus, although it had previously been

Considering the impact of climate change on human communities significantly alters the outcome of sp

Segan, D. B., Hole, D.G., Donatti, C.I., Zganjar, C., Martin, S., Butchart, S.H.M. and J.E.M. Watson (2015). Considering the impact of climate change on human communities significantly alters the outcome of species and site-based vulnerability assessments. Diversity and Distributions, 21: 1101 – 1111. Human activities are largely responsible for the processes that threaten biodiversity, yet potential changes in human behaviour as a response to climate change are ignored in most species and site-based vulnerability assessments (VAs). Here we show that when the potential impact of climate change on humans is incorporated into well-established site and species VA methodologies, the outcomes bec

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